buttock pain wallet

Buttock Pain? Is your heavy wallet to blame

Buttock Pain

Is your heavy wallet to blame?

Do you experience a sharp pain right at the centre of your buttock; especially when you sit? Do you get a sharp shooting pain radiating down your legs?

Well, this could be because of your big fat wallet. When it comes to wallet, size matters !

Carrying a big wallet in your back pocket can cause a major trouble to your back & buttocks. Your wallet may be a one stop locale for keeping your cards, cash, bills & coins. But sitting with heavy wallets in your back pocket can put a lot of stress on your buttocks, back and hip. The problem starts when your nerve in the buttock, known as SCIATIC NERVE gets pinched between your wallet & buttock. It causes pain in your hip and/or buttock. It can also cause pain all the way from your buttock down your leg.

Stuffing a wallet in your back pocket also tilts your pelvis to one side which puts more stress on your spine. Bigger the wallet; the more lopsided you sit & the achier your buttocks would be…

To minimize the stress on your buttock & spine, a small wallet that holds only the essentials is recommended. Also remember to take it out while seated for a long time – whether you are in a car, public transport or at your desk.

Instances of pain can be effectively managed by Physiotherapy treatment. So carry a smart wallet without wrecking your back

 

 

back pain

Low Back Pain, You’re not the only one

Low Back Pain

You're not the only one

Low back pain (LBP) is very common and reported by 80% of people at some time in their life but a lot of people just live with the pain. Many a times, LBP is not serious and will usually get better with rest and movement.

For everyday causes of lower back pain, standard at-home pain management is a reasonable approach. In fact, most cases of lower back pain are caused by a muscle strain and will get better relatively quickly and do not require treatment from a medical professional.

However, it may be serious, if you are suffering with pins & needles, numbness, referred pain, extreme pain, headaches, problems with speech, vision or hearing please seek medical help immediately.

There are things you can do to help relieve the common back pain. But sometimes the pain can last a long time or keep coming back. If pain has lasted longer than one or two weeks, or begins to interfere with your mobility and daily activities, you should seek help from a trained medical professional for quick relief and recovery.

Quick Tips to keep back pain away

   1. Movement - Exercise regularly

   2. Keep posture in mind

   3. Have a good night's rest

   4. Keep your back supported

You could find some very easy and convenient exercises for your back in the office setting 

back pain

Back Pain – Causes, Self Care, FAQ and Home Exercise

Eighty percent of us will experience back problems at some point in our lives. Back pain is ranked second only to headaches as the most frequent cause of pain, and tops the list of workplace injuries, causing more loss of time, disability and money than any other workplace injury. Our backs are a carefully engineered network of bones, tendons, ligaments, and nerves that help balance and bear the weight of our bodies and the loads we carry. Any minor damage or imbalance to this delicate system can stress muscles and joints, causing pain and injury. A lifetime of poor posture, poor lifting, bending and reaching, and twisting activities can gradually weaken your back’s supportive structures as well as cause pain and injury.

Risk Factors for Back Pain
Being overweight. Your back has to support too much weight when you’re carrying extra pounds.
Poor muscle tone. If your muscles are not well toned, they can’t meet the challenge when you ask something extra of them.
Poor posture. Poor posture creates bodily stress, which can result in pain.
Improper lifting. Heavy lifting, carrying children, as well as occupational lifting can cause injury.
Desk /computer jobs. Our bodies don’t thrive sitting for long periods of time hunched over keyboards or other workspaces.
Unhappiness. Researchers have found that general dissatisfaction with our social and economic situations can double or triple the risk of low back pain.

With all these risk factors, it’s no wonder so many of us suffer from back pain. But it’s not a part of life you have to passively accept.

Frequently Asked Questions
Take a look at the following frequently asked questions—they’ll help you further understand this condition, and better care for yourself and your family.

Do I need surgery for my bad back?
No, not usually. More times than not, your back pain can be treated without going under the knife. However, some conditions, like a herniated disk, may benefit
from surgery. Even still, herniated disks may heal on their own. Bottom line—you should carefully consider your options, and then consider them again, before thinking about surgery.

What about alternative therapy?
Non-traditional therapy is becoming more widely accepted these days. It wasn’t long ago that chiropractic treatment was viewed as an “alternative” therapy. Now these specialists are a common part of the back care landscape. Other alternative therapies have received praise from sufferers, too. The choice is up to you.

Sit at a desk all day. Am I at risk for back pain and injury?
Yes. It’s a common misconception that physical laborers and construction workers are at a higher risk for back injuries. The fact is, those individuals in sedentary jobs are at risk for back injury, too. Exercise and regular movement are important factors in maintaining a healthy back.

How can I arrange my office environment to protect my back?
A chair with good back support and height adjusters that allow you to keep both feet flat on the floor can do wonders to keep your back in a healthy state. If you don’t have an adjustable chair, try to use a chair with a simple straight back whenever possible. Also, when it comes to your desk, arrange items (phone, keyboard, monitor, etc.) where you won’t have to twist and turn excessively to access them.

Will my back pain ever go away?
There’s good news and bad news. First the good news. With proper self-care and good prevention techniques you can be well on your way to fighting off back pain. Now the bad news. Considering that 80 percent of Indians experience back pain at some point in their lives—much of it recurring—you may never get rid of back pain altogether. That’s why it’s important to practice the prevention tips included in this section—and keep doing them even when you’re feeling better.

You may see an expert at ReLivaTM Physiotherapy & Rehab to ease your back pain and get a customised plan to keep your back happy.

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy.

pain relief exercises in office

Stretching Exercises in Office: Neck, Back pain

Quick tips for pain relief!

Be Active at workplace. Do these simple stretching exercises while standing anywhere in office to avoid that pain – either in the back or neck! This poster from ReLiva is intended to support individuals and organisations in the promotion of physical activity in the workplace and to reduce sedentary behaviour.

Taking the time to stretch throughout the day anywhere – in office or at home, can have numerous health benefits. Stretching can improve flexibility and is an important activity to warm up or cool down after exercise. Stretching can also be a fun and healthy break from your computer screen during the work day. This along with correct posture while sitting at your desk, also helps you to keep all those pain in the back and neck away.

This newly developed Standing Stretch Sheet is perfect to do before a lunchtime walk, and for those who have standing roles. The 5 Minute Office Stretch Sheet while sitting at your work desk also provides you with 6 simple and effective stretches that you can complete whilst sitting at your work station.

We recommend you repeat each stretch twice, and hold each time for 20 seconds.

Print a copy and pin it up next to your workstation to remind you and your colleagues – Have you stretched today?

ReLiva stretching Exercises for back, neck pain in office, standing

pains and aches

Muscle Strain, Sprain or Injury – The RICE Protocol

Muscle Strain, Sprain & Injury: RICEStrains and Sprains - RICE Protocol

Muscle Strains or Muscle pulls often happen when you put a lot of pressure on a muscle or you push it too far, such as when lifting heavy object. Strains are more likely to happen if you haven't warmed up first, to get blood circulating to the muscles. They're also common for someone returning to a sport after a break or suddenly taking up rigorous exercises.
Sprains are caused by injuries, such as twisting your ankle. This kind of injury is common and can happen any time you trip or fall. One lady sprained her ankle when she was crossing a pot-holed road!
Muscle pain - no matter how you describe it - "pulled muscle", "muscle strain", "muscle injury" or "torn tear" the end result is injury to your muscle potentially resulting in muscle spasms, pain, weakness and reduced muscle performance.

Symptoms of Strain, Sprain or Injury
You can suspect a muscle strain or injury if you experience:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Muscle tightness
  • Inability to fully stretch your injured muscle

What to do?
Treatment options vary depending on the severity of your strain or tear. Until you've been accurately diagnosed by a medical practitioner, RICE is usually very helpful.

What is RICE Protocol ?

RICE is used as the first treatment for many muscle strains, ligament sprains, or other bruises and injuries. RICE is used immediately  after an injury happens and for the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. Rest, ice, compression, and elevation can help reduce the  swelling and pain and help you heal faster.

REST

After a muscle, bone, or joint injury you need to take some time off from your activities to allow your body to heal. For example, if you sprained your ankle, you need to not walk around or put weight on your ankle. You should rest the injured body part until it no longer hurts to use it or put pressure on it. You should rest the injured body part for at least 1 to 2 days. If the injury is serious, you may need to see a healthcare provider.

ICING

Icing helps control swelling and inflammation around the injured area. Ice should be put on an injury as soon as possible as early application usually helps the injury heal faster. Never put ice directly on the skin. Wrap a bag of ice in a towel or a piece of clean cloth. If ice is not available, use a cold water bottle.
Leave the ice on for 10-15 minutes then remove it for 10 minutes so the area can warm up to room temperature. You may repeat this process two to three times. Ice helps particularly during the first 1-2 days after an injury.

COMPRESSION

Compression helps limit swelling to the injured area. It also provides some additional support to the injured area. You may use a doctor's bandage, crepe bandage, a dupatta or even a piece of clothing to tie around the injured area. Be sure not to tie it too tightly. Putting it on too tight can cut off the blood supply to the area.

ELEVATION

Elevation is another way to help decrease swelling by using gravity. If you can, keep the injured part above the level of your heart. This helps blood go back to the heart. If you can't raise the injured body part above the level of your heart, at least keep it parallel to the ground.

When to seek Physiotherapy Treatment?
Returning to your routine activities or sport can be easy or complicated depending on the muscle affected. Some muscle tears such as hamstrings are notoriously difficult to get right. That's when it is very important to seek professional assistance. Ideally your physiotherapist should undertake at least:

  • an assessment of your muscle function, core stability and biomechanics to avoid injury recurrence.
  • a muscle rehabilitation program that incorporates components of strength, endurance, flexibility and speed that is specific to your routine activities or chosen sport.

If you suffer a muscle tear which fails to respond after a few days or continues to niggle, please contact ReLivaTM Physiotherapy & Rehab for more specific advice.

In case there is bleeding or shooting pain or excessive swelling or the symptoms do not subside after a day of RICE, you should see a doctor.

Readers are advised to use their own discretion while using the contents of this article. Please go through our Disclaimer and  Privacy Policy.

fibromyalgia chronic pain

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that presents itself as a syndrome, characterized by body aches and pain, weakness, stiffness, tender points around joints and stressful mind. We at ReLiva Physiotherapy and Rehab help you deal with the various symptoms of fibromyalgia present at any point of this chronic condition in the best possible ways at our clinics in Thane, Vashi, Nerul and Navi Mumbai.

While there is no definite cure of this condition, physiotherapy helps in reducing the symptoms as well as improving the quality of life of an individual suffering from fibromyalgia. Something as easy as postural correction and correct postural habits taught by the physiotherapist helps the patient in relieving the stress placed on the tissues as well as relaxes the body.

Pain, which is the most disabling symptom of this condition, is dealt aptly by using hydrotherapy in the form of moist hot packs that is applied at the painful area or also by using cryotherapy, as per the patients’ condition and need. Along with this, myofascial release techniques may be used to release the tension off the muscles as well as produce relaxation. Tender point release therapy is used to treat the tender points while is followed by cryotherapy to reduce pain, promote healing and prevent any muscle soreness. Pain may also be treated with the help of electrotherapy equipment like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) depending on the severity of the pain.

Stiffness is reduced by incorporating various stretching exercises that help improving the flexibility of the muscles. By loosening up the tight and stiff muscles, it helps reduce the tension built up in the muscles and helps relieve any stress placed on them. This also leads to pain reduction and induces relaxation. Various active and passive stretching exercises are done and also taught to the patient with the correct dosage and method. Along with this accurate range of motion (ROM) exercises are taught to the patient that helps in keeping the joints healthy and preventing any stiff joint conditions in the future. Strength training of the muscles forms the basic line of treatment for the weakness that the muscles develop in fibromyalgia. Gradual and slowly progressing strengthening exercises are taught to the patients, starting with free exercises and moving on to resistance training.

Aerobic exercises (low-speed, low-impact) also form a very important line of treatment in patients suffering from fibromyalgia. Aerobic training not only prevents the deconditioning of the body but also helps induce relaxation. They have significant beneficial effects on physical function, well being and potentially reducing pain. Stationary bicycle, steppers (to perform graded and controlled stair-case climbing) and other devices are used to perform aerobic training. Aerobic exercises help improving the overall quality of life by training the lungs and heart and increasing their ability to function.

Relaxation techniques that are taught to the patients help relax their mind and body and hence bring the stress levels down. This in turn induces good sleep and helps fight sleep disturbances. In this way it helps the patient maintain good health by taking necessary rest periods along with supervised physical activity. Lifestyle modification would be incorporating activities like walking, cycling, swimming, gardening, etc in leisure time that not only help in relaxing the mind but also maintain the body strength to fight fatigue and pain. Outdoor sports should be taken up to maintain good body functioning, as well as aid relaxation.

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. It is a chronic condition diagnosed by the doctors based on patient’s symptoms and physical examination. Fibromyalgia mainly includes widespread muscle pain along with painful point around the joints, which is not actually joint pain but pain in the tissues around the joint. It is usually referred to as ‘fibromyalgia syndrome’ as it presents with a group of symptoms together. Common fibromyalgia symptoms may include generalized aches and pains and crippling fatigue. Presence of tender points, disturbed sleep, mood disturbances and depression is also seen. Muscles give the feeling of being over worked all the time. There may be pain and achiness around joints in the neck, shoulder, back and hips which make it difficult for the patient to sleep or exercise. Other symptoms may include abdominal pain, chronic headaches, and dryness in mouth, nose and eyes, incontinence, irritable bowel syndrome, stiffness, numbness/tingling in fingers and feet. Tender points at specific areas around the joints give a clear picture of the condition.

Diagnosis is mainly made on comprehensive physical examination and on the patient’s medical history. Research still continues on devising any specific blood test that could help confirm the diagnosis (e.g. FM/a) to rule out any other serious condition, your doctor may ask you to carry out a compete blood count(CBC), tests for thyroid, etc. Also, since the pain and symptoms are similar to that seen in arthritic conditions like Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis, specific tests to rule out these conditions is also done. A detailed FAQ regarding fibromyalgia can be found here.

What causes Fibromyalgia

It is still unclear why people develop fibromyalgia but theories suggest that it is not the outcome of a single factor but combination of factors working together. One of the researches suggests that poor physical conditioning leads to the symptoms of fibromyalgia while other suggests that continuous microtrauma leads to ongoing cycle of pain and fatigue. Combination of many physical and emotional stressors is believed to be responsible for the condition. Genetics is also believed to be one of the causes and fibromyalgia is seen running in families. Environmental factors like trauma, infections, etc are also believed to be contributing to causing fibromyalgia. Hormonal and chemical disturbances are also responsible in causing pain.

It is mainly thought to be a glitch in the way the body perceives pain. One of the main theories suggests that people suffering from fibromyalgia have developed changes in the way the Central Nervous System (CNS) processes the pain messages carried out by the body. Also low level of hormones like serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine in the brain lead to alteration in mood, appetite, sleep, behave and response to stressful situations. Also hormones help regulate the processing of pain messages in the brain.

Benefits of Physiotherapy Treatment for Fibromyalgia patients

The benefit of physiotherapy is that it allows a person with fibromyalgia to work closely with a trained professional who can design a fibromyalgia-specific treatment program. The therapist documents your progress and gauges whether you are performing/practicing good therapy habits, alignments, and movement patterns when doing ‘homework’ or exercises at home.

Anne Reicherter, PT, DPT, PhD, a licensed physical therapist and associate professor in the department of physical therapy in the School of Medicine of the University of Maryland in Baltimore, says physical therapy can help fibromyalgia patients “manage” their daily living with less pain and generally make life more enjoyable”. She explains that people with fibromyalgia pain are often caught in a vicious cycle: Pain and fatigue prevent them from being active and exercising, but inactivity can trigger more pain and fatigue.

ReLiva Physiotherapy and Rehab helps you deal with fibromyalgia by using the following in their tailor-made and effectively designed treatment program:

    • Stretching Exercises
    • Strengthening Exercises
    • Pain Relief Methods
    • Aerobic Training
    • Myofascial Release
    • Relaxation Techniques

Myths and Facts about Fibromyalgia

1.   Myth: Fibromyalgia is rare.

Fact: Fibromyalgia is one of the most common types of chronic pain disorders. Census reports more than 10 million cases per year in India.

2.   Myth: Fibromyalgia is “all in the head.”

Fact: Fibromyalgia has been described for centuries. But it wasn’t until 1981 that the first scientific study formally confirmed fibromyalgia symptoms and tender points in the body. Since then, researchers have future tested pain reaction in people with fibromyalgia.

  • Imaging studies show that the brains of people with fibromyalgia have more activity in reaction to pain.
  • Studies also have shown that people with fibromyalgia feel pain more intensely at lower levels than people without the condition.
sacroiliac joint pain

SI Joint / Pelvic Pain – Do’s & Don’ts

Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Dysfunction can cause significant discomfort and pain in sitting and lying down. The Hip joint seems to have got locked and does not allow smooth transition from one position to another. Following are few techniques that can help significantly to ease such restricted movement and pain.

1. Rolling Over in Bed:

To roll over from your back to your side, bend one knee, placing your foot on the bed.  Push the heel down, slightly lifting your buttocks and turn towards the side on which the leg is still extended straight. The top arm helps the turning motion.

 

2. Sitting:tailor position

  1. When sitting (whether you are driving a car, riding a bicycle or sitting on a chair), press your chest upward and let your shoulder blades relax and drop.
  2. Sitting in a tailor’s position is good (crossed legged with your feet crossed underneath your legs) on the floor or on a very firm bed; use your hands to pull your knees gently back towards your hips and lift your chest, and keep your shoulders low.
  3. If you have been sitting in this position for a while, stretch forward as far as you can and touch the floor in front of you while keeping your spine straight.  At the same time, look up.  Practice this stretch as often as it feels necessary and good.

Static Sitting Positions:

  • Sit on a chair with your knees apart and slightly turned out
  • Sit in positions that relax your lower back while it remains supported, using a cushion or a rolled towel behind your back; sit upright when the back is not supported
  • You can also stretch your hips by sitting high enough so that your knees are lower than your hips or by crossing your feet under your chair.
  • Use a ball cushion while you are sitting, or sit on a therapy ball; sitting on a ball cushion allows your tailbone to be free.  When you use a ball cushion or ball, you develop active stomach and back muscles over time as a result of trying to maintain your balance
  • A good posture for resting is lying on your back on the floor, putting your feet up on the couch or bed, with a small pillow to support your back and/or head
  • If you have tailbone pain, this may be caused by your pelvic floor being too tight.  Favor positions that open your hips, push your legs downward away from your torso (sitting on the edge of the chair or on a ball) or crossing your feet under your chair; let your vaginal muscles relax as much as possible

3. Standing:

  • Bend your knees slightly
  • Distribute your weight evenly on both legs
  • Point your toes slightly outward
  • This posture may feel unnatural in the beginning, but if you look in the mirror, you’ll see that it looks quite normal.

Related Articles:

Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint dysfunction

SI Pain & Pregnancy – Tips

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy.

sacroiliitis

Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint, or SI joint, is thought to cause low back and/or leg pain. The leg pain can be particularly difficult, and may feel similar to sciatica or pain caused by a lumbar disc herniation.

 Where is SI Joint and Why Does it Hurt?      Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

There are two Sacroiliac (SI) joints in your body, located on either side of the triangle-shaped bone at the bottom of the spine where it connects to your pelvis. The SI joints are a shock absorber for your spine and provide stability for your body as you run, walk, or jump. Interestingly enough, the SI joints usually don’t move more than 2 – 4 millimeters themselves. But each one contains many nerve endings that can cause significant pain if the joint is damaged or loses its ability to move properly. Everyday wear and tear, arthritis, or a single injury can damage these joints, changing their normal movement and creating chronic and sometimes debilitating SI joint pain that often, generally feels like low back pain.

Causes:

While it is not clear how the pain is caused, it is thought that an alteration in the normal joint motion may be the culprit that causes sacroiliac pain. This source of pain can be caused by either:

  • Too much movement (hypermobility or instability): The pain is typically felt in the lower back and/or hip and may radiate into groin area.
  • Too little movement (hypomobility or fixation): The pain is typically felt on one side of the low back or buttocks, and can radiate down the leg. The pain usually remains above the knee, but at times pain can extend to the ankle or foot.

Sacroiliitis (inflammation at SI Joint), Osteoarthritis, SI Joint Injury, Altered Walking Pattern, Infection, Prior Lumbar Fusion and Pregnancy are known to trigger SI Joint Dysfunction.

Symptoms of SI Joint Pain & Diagnosis

Some common symptoms for SI Joint Dysfunction are:

  • Low back pain: Usually a dull ache on one side of your lower back that may extend into the thigh.
  • Buttock Pain: Pain can range from an ache to a sharp stabbing pain that extends down one or both legs.
  • Low Back Pain While Climbing Stairs: Activities that require the pelvis to twist may produce SI joint pain.
  • Difficulty Sitting or Lying on One Side: Often experienced as an ache on one side that causes you to shift weight to one side to relieve the pain in the other.

It is important that a medical expert diagnose the cause of your lower back pain.  Though the symptoms may be similar, however the treatment will greatly depend upon the underlying cause.

Treatment for SI Joint Dysfunction:

Treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SI joint pain) are usually conservative (meaning non-surgical) and focus on trying to restore normal motion in the joint.

Typical treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction include:

  • RICE :  R.I.C.E. treatment that typically includes use of ice or cold packs, applied in 15 to 20 minute intervals as needed to reduce inflammation in the area, along with rest is recommended to ease symptoms. Depending on the duration of sharp, intense pain, ice can be continued anywhere between 2 days to 2 weeks. Once the inflammation is less, gradual return to normal activities may be advisable. Read more: RICE
    SI Joint belt
  • Medicines: Your doctor may prescribe pain medications as well as anti-inflammatory medications to reduce the swelling that is usually contributing to the pain.
  • Supports, braces and Belts: When the SI joint is “hypermobile” or too loose, an “orthotic” or SI brace about the size of a rather wide waist-belt can be wrapped around the waist and pulled snugly to stabilize the area. This can sometimes be very helpful at times when the joint is inflamed or painful. When it calms down, the support can be weaned away.
  • Physiotherapy and Exercise :

Controlled, gradual physical therapy is an evidence based technique found helpful to strengthen the muscles around the sacroiliac joint and appropriately increase range of motion. Supervised gentle exercise will help increase the flow of blood to the area, which in turn stimulates a healing response.

Contact a ReLivaTM Expert to get a customized SI joint pain treatment programs designed for your specific concerns. It may include stabilization training, stretching exercises and heat/ice therapy to compliment other treatment aspects prescribed by your doctor.

 

Coping with Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Adding exercise and physical therapy to your sacroiliac joint dysfunction treatment plan can significantly help you manage SI joint pain symptoms. There are numerous gentle exercises and stretches you can do to help decrease pain caused by SI joint dysfunction.

Contact a ReLiva Expert to design overall exercise plan for SI joint dysfunction, incorporating the 3 main types of exercise—aerobic, strengthening, and flexibility exercises—into your workout routine.

Related articles :

Do’s and Don’ts for SI Joint Pain / Pelvis Pain

SI Pain and Pregnancy

“This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy at http://reliva.in/disclaimer.php”

ergonomics right posture sitting

Ergonomics in Office : Correct Posture of sitting

Ergonomics in Office is increasingly important to avoid common aches and pains. If you adopt correct posture of sitting at your place in office, and follow simple rules, it can keep your back and muscles healthy for long.

Apart from following correct posture at work, you should try some simple stretching to improve flexibility. Stretching can also be a fun and healthy break from your computer screen during the work day. This also helps you to keep all those pain in the back and neck away.

Our 5 Minute Office Stretch Sheet provides you with 6 simple and effective stretches that you can complete whilst sitting at your work station. The newly developed Standing Stretch Sheet is perfect to do before a lunchtime walk, and for those who have standing roles.

Print a copy and pin it up next to your workstation to remind you and your colleagues – Are you sitting correctly?

Ergonomics in Office : Correct posture of sitting in workplace

 

pregnancy aches and pains

Pregnancy related Common Aches & Pains

Pregnancy causes many changes in the body – Physical, chemical as well as emotional. These changes are generally influenced by sudden and dramatic increase in hormone levels, especially Oestrogen, Progesterone and Relaxin.  Physical changes due to weight-gain can put a considerable strain on your musculo-skeletal system. The increase in weight along with the hormone named Relaxin, puts enormous stress on our joints, ligaments and other tissues of the body. In addition, repetitive daily activities and being in one position for too long can further aggravate pain.

If Relaxin is the reason our ligaments become laxed, then why does our body secrete it during pregnancy? Relaxin prepares the pelvic floor muscles and the pelvic ring for child birth. It allows the ligaments around the pelvis to relax. But along with pelvic ligaments, it also acts on the ligaments throughout the body, thus increasing general flexibility. Although increased in flexibility sounds promising, ligaments are responsible for stabilising our joints, therefore lax ligaments also mean relatively unstable joints.

Pregnancy and Pain

Common Aches & Pains related to Pregnancy   

A. SI Joint Pain

Sacroiliac Joint Pain occurs on one side of your low back where the dimples appear. This is where the sacrum and the ilium (bone of the pelvis) meet. Relaxin hormone weakens ligaments so the birth canal widens for delivery. Often, the ligaments become too loose and overstretched. This leads to an unstable pelvis which may feel “wobbly”. The tissues often become pinched in the joint which can create sharp or deep pain. The joint may throb for hours due to swollen, irritated tissues. Read more : SI Joint Pain in Pregnancy

B. Sciatica Pain

Sciatica is leg pain caused by pressure on the sciatic nerve from a tense buttock muscle. It often occurs in conjunction with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

C. Back pain

Back pain in pregnancy has many possible causes. It usually is caused by strain on the back muscles. In mid pregnancy, when uterus becomes heavier, it changes center of gravity. Most women begin to lean backward in the later months of pregnancy – making their back muscles work harder. Weakness of the abdominal muscles can also cause back pain. The abdominal muscles normally support the spine and play an important role in the health of the back. Relaxing over stretches these muscles and can also make one more prone to injury while exercising. Read more : Back Pain

Dealing with these Aches & Pains

Most of the common discomforts and aches & pains associated with pregnancy can be dealt easily by 3 simple non-medicinal ways:

You can join ReLivaTM FabMoms program and learn to deal with these aches & pains in an easy and fun way. Our Experts can design a customized one-on-one Antenatal Fitness plan for your requirement and supervise you on your way to be a FAB Mom or you may join a more fun setting for antenatal fitness in Group Therapy.

Related Articles:

SI Joint / Pelvic Pain – Do’s & Don’ts
Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction
Benefits of exercise during Pregnancy
Posture in Pregnancy: Do’s & Don’ts
Happy & Fit Pregnancy ; Back to Shape afterwards
SI Pain & Pregnancy Tips
Infographic on Why Exercise while Pregnant

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy Policy.

high heels cause pain

High Heels: To Wear or Not to Wear?

There will hardly be a woman who would not love to wear high heels (having put rationale aside) and appear as a long legged, stylish lady! And there are a lot of them who cannot forego the attraction, despite the discomfort that high heeled shoes bring with them!

Here are few facts related to High heel shoes

what do high heels do to our body

High heels are one of the biggest causes of knee pain because they throw your whole body out of alignment. Your feet are forced up at an unnatural angle, so your body is pushed forward and the balls of your feet are supporting all of your weight. This causes your knees to tense up and work harder to keep you upright, while the forward position puts more pressure on the shock-absorbing cartilage under your kneecaps. After a few hours, you will probably feel some discomfort in heels, but the real damage — such as chronic knee and back pain and osteoarthritis — may not be apparent for some time.

Shoes that have no heel at all can also cause knee pain

As a general rule, wearing shoes with heels no higher than three-quarters of an inch will help to maximize knee support. However, shoes that have no heel at all can also cause knee pain by not adequately cushioning your feet as they hit the ground and increasing the amount of shock the joint has to absorb. For this reason, avoid shoes with heels that are lower than half an inch.

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