exercising safely in summers

Exercising Safely In Summer

The heat of summer combined with a busy holiday calendar means exercise and workouts fall down the priority list during the summer months of May-June. We’ve put a list together to help you keep active, while taking appropriate precautions to avoid heatstroke.

Hydration
Drink about two cups of water in the 2 hours before exercising. 2-3 cups (500-750 ml) of cool water or sports drink per hour are sufficient for most sports, if you are exercising for 60 minutes or longer. Thumb rule is that Water intake should always balance out the sweat loss during that time.

Avoid the afternoons when it is the hottest
Get up early and exercise before the sun begins to heat-up, or go out in the evenings or later if it is safe to do so. In the heat of the day, take cover under shade. Go for a swim or sign up for an aqua-aerobics class. or workout indoors.


Dress up for the weather
Cotton, cotton, Cotton ! Light weight, light coloured, loose fitting clothes, made of natural fibres or composite fabrics with high absorption property, are recommended as the most appropriate clothing in the heat as the allow ventilation.

Cover up
Always wear sunscreen, sunglasses and a hat when stepping out in the sun.
Wear protective equipment such as helmets, padding and/or mouthguards, where required and remove as soon as activity is finished.

Go easy
You may not be able to push yourself as hard as normal when it’s really hot and humid, so slow down. So a good trick is to start slow and work your way up.

If you’re feeling any of the following, rest immediately:

  • Weakness
  • Light-headedness
  • Dizziness
  • Paling of the skin
  • Headache
  • Muscle cramps
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Rapid heartbeat

For people who don’t exercise regularly or those who are at increased risk of heat-related illness should avoid exercising in the heat. Instead, opt for a prescribed, gradual and incremental exercise program. Some medications may also have an effect on your ability to exercise safely in the heat. Always speak to your doctor if you are unsure.

exercise

No time for exercise? 10 tips to get moving

Running to office? Got to get kids ready for school! Got to meet the deadline. House guests are coming and there is still so much to be shopped. The list goes on and on and what inevitably happens is no time left for exercise. This is not just your story but of the most of the people around. If you are still struggling to find time for exercise, read on to discover some quick and easy tips to get moving.

“Building physical activity back into our daily lives is one of the great public health challenges of this century,” said Russell Pate, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Exercise at the University of South Carolina. “Our bodies were designed to be physically active, and they don’t do well with long-term exposure to sedentary living.  Lack of physical activity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.”

Follow these simple trips to add some more action to your everyday life.

  1. Play with your child. Whether you do it at home or go outdoors, just pick up that ball or the bat or both and get into some action with your child. This will not just get your muscles moving but give you a great chance to bond with your child too.
  2. Walk the dog. Take the chance to walk your dog than to let someone else do it. This is your chance to get some fresh air and also get a quick 10-15 minute walk. The brisker you walk, the better the exercise for your dog too.
  3. Ditch the elevator. Start using the staircase instead of the lift specially to climb up, Start with getting off one floor below your destination to climb up the last staircase and gradually start getting off two floors below and improve it thereon.
  4. Don’t let the weather spoil your walk. If it is raining or it is too cold outside, just drive to your nearest mall with your sport shoes on. Walk around the mall, window shopping ( or not), climb the stairs and finish your daily walk.
  5. Carry your sports shoes on holidays. Walking around in a holiday not only lets you enjoy the weather and locale better but also lets you use your muscles.
  6. Pursue an outdoor hobby. Whether it is cricket, football, badminton, cycling, tennis or just frisbie; make sure you indulge in it every once in a week. The fun will takeaway the dread from physical activity.
  7. Park the farthest. Do not fret if you get a parking slot away from the building entrance. Infact try to consciously park your car away and just walk it to the entry.
  8. Walk the talk. While on a phone call, get up and stroll around the room. While the no time for exmind is occupied in the conversation, the muscles would get a decent stretch and movement.
  9. Goto them. Instead of calling your executives to your desk, take the chance to get up and goto them every once in a while. While they will warm up to your gesture, you will have moved your muscles a bit more.
  10. Lug the bag. The shopping bag may have become heavy but that gives you a chance to add weight to your walking. Ditch the trolley to your car/home and carry the bags yourself.

So if you still think you have not time for exercise, these simple tips will help you sneak in some exercise in your existing schedule. As they say, those who do not find time for exercise – have to find time for illness. Don’t let anything prevent you from taking care of your own self.

ReLiva Tips for an Injury-free Run

5 Tips to Prepare for an Injury-free Run                                                            

For runners, taking on a run for the first time, the key is to have a solid training base and a detailed plan that allows
for a gradual increase in SPEED as well as DISTANCE.

Too Much. Too Soon. Too Fast

The most common issue that we see is the “Terrible Too’s”. You suddenly get up and start to train without a plan and end up doing “ Too much. Too soon, Too fast”
And that is the most common cause of Injury!
Chalk out a plan of training! Even better, if you do it along with a trained expert. The training plan should strike a balance between speed and strength. It would help you build up stamina, strength and endurance gradually, without causing any injury.

Prevention is better than Cure

Always remember to warm up, before you start running. Many injuries can be avoided by:
warming up  and stretching regularly
Spending 10 minutes to warm up before each run will definitely cost you much lesser time than if you injure yourself and wait back to recover.
However if you do injure, it’s best to see a physiotherapy expert immediately to chalk out a quick recovery plan.

Mix Things Up

It is very easy to get into a habit of running the same route, at the same pace during your training. That begins to limit your muscles and their strength.
“Mix things up!”
Challenge your body with harder runs on certain days and recover at a slower pace another day. This will work-out many more muscles in a much more variety and keep them prepared against injuries.

Keep Moving

Any good training plan needs no more than four days of running or walking every week. That’s not too much to do!
It is important that you don’t overdo it! And equally important, that you keep doing it sincerely! You can make the switch from run & Walk to only run if you
find it too easy. The day you feel, you’re not ready, continue to do walking! But ensure that you ‘Keep Moving’.

Look after your Body

While you train for your run, your body and muscles undergo a lot of wear and tear. Listen to your body! If you are tired, it’s a sign that the body needs rest! Overtraining immediately shows in form of decreased performance and injuries !
Look after your body. Swimming, Sauna or steam room can really help relax and stretch on a bit.

With these 5 things you can easily train for your run without worrying to injure yourself. Enjoy every step that you take to prepare yourself. Remember – “It only makes you stronger and better than what you were before!”

This article is an attempt to make the runners aware of the general thumb rules about running related injuries. These guidelines should not take the place of medical advice if attempting to return to sports following an injury. If an athlete requires assistance during or in the progression of a return to sport program they should consult with their medical expert, or physiotherapist

Running Injury : WARNING signs and Care

Marathon runners push the body’s limit to increase their exercise capacity. But they shouldn’t ignore the vital signs of injury andRunning Injuries- Warning signs and care learn to differentiate a serious injury from a minor one.

This article is an attempt to make the runners aware of the general thumb rules about running related injuries.

Warning Signs of Injury

What pain is ok?

• General muscle soreness

• Slight joint discomfort after workout or next day that is gone in 24 hours

• Slight stiffness at beginning of run or walk that goes away after first 10 minutes

What pain is not okay? (You should not train!)

• Pain that is keeping you awake at night

• Pain that is evident at beginning of run/walk then becomes worse as run/walk continues

• Pain that changes your stride/ style of run

What to do if I get reinjured / injured?

• Ice area: 15-20 minutes several times per day  (RICE Protocol)

• Elevate injured part while icing

• Rest (at least initially)

• Analyze program for possible causes

o What did I do differently in training?                                                     reliva- the official Physiotherapy Partner for Navi Mumbai Mayor's Marathon

o Big jump in speed of running?

o Significant pace increase?

o Shoes worn out? Or change in shoe model?

o Change from all treadmill or soft surface to road running?

• Cross-train on non-impact cardio – follow similar minutes that you were doing running/walking (elliptical or swimming or cycling)

• Determine plan to return to full program, return to running very slowly

• Physical therapist and/or orthopedic

Warning Signs of Overtraining

• Difficulty performing typical workouts for more than a week

• Excessive fatigue

• Higher resting heart rate

• Decreased appetite

• Sorer muscles

• Troubled sleep

• Irritability

• Increased perspiration

• Decreased desire to train

Whether you happened to injure yourself by accident or by over training, do not lose heart. If you reach out to a trained physiotherapist soon enough after the injury, the chances are that you can recover much faster  and get back to your training than if you just sit back and wait for it to heal itself.

These guidelines should not take the place of medical advice if attempting to return to sports following an injury. If an athlete requires assistance during or in the progression of a return to sport program they should consult with their medical expert, or physiotherapist.

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