buttock pain wallet

Buttock Pain? Is your heavy wallet to blame

Buttock Pain

Is your heavy wallet to blame?

Do you experience a sharp pain right at the centre of your buttock; especially when you sit? Do you get a sharp shooting pain radiating down your legs?

Well, this could be because of your big fat wallet. When it comes to wallet, size matters !

Carrying a big wallet in your back pocket can cause a major trouble to your back & buttocks. Your wallet may be a one stop locale for keeping your cards, cash, bills & coins. But sitting with heavy wallets in your back pocket can put a lot of stress on your buttocks, back and hip. The problem starts when your nerve in the buttock, known as SCIATIC NERVE gets pinched between your wallet & buttock. It causes pain in your hip and/or buttock. It can also cause pain all the way from your buttock down your leg.

Stuffing a wallet in your back pocket also tilts your pelvis to one side which puts more stress on your spine. Bigger the wallet; the more lopsided you sit & the achier your buttocks would be…

To minimize the stress on your buttock & spine, a small wallet that holds only the essentials is recommended. Also remember to take it out while seated for a long time – whether you are in a car, public transport or at your desk.

Instances of pain can be effectively managed by Physiotherapy treatment. So carry a smart wallet without wrecking your back

 

 

sacroiliac joint pain

SI Joint / Pelvic Pain – Do’s & Don’ts

Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Dysfunction can cause significant discomfort and pain in sitting and lying down. The Hip joint seems to have got locked and does not allow smooth transition from one position to another. Following are few techniques that can help significantly to ease such restricted movement and pain.

1. Rolling Over in Bed:

To roll over from your back to your side, bend one knee, placing your foot on the bed.  Push the heel down, slightly lifting your buttocks and turn towards the side on which the leg is still extended straight. The top arm helps the turning motion.

 

2. Sitting:tailor position

  1. When sitting (whether you are driving a car, riding a bicycle or sitting on a chair), press your chest upward and let your shoulder blades relax and drop.
  2. Sitting in a tailor’s position is good (crossed legged with your feet crossed underneath your legs) on the floor or on a very firm bed; use your hands to pull your knees gently back towards your hips and lift your chest, and keep your shoulders low.
  3. If you have been sitting in this position for a while, stretch forward as far as you can and touch the floor in front of you while keeping your spine straight.  At the same time, look up.  Practice this stretch as often as it feels necessary and good.

Static Sitting Positions:

  • Sit on a chair with your knees apart and slightly turned out
  • Sit in positions that relax your lower back while it remains supported, using a cushion or a rolled towel behind your back; sit upright when the back is not supported
  • You can also stretch your hips by sitting high enough so that your knees are lower than your hips or by crossing your feet under your chair.
  • Use a ball cushion while you are sitting, or sit on a therapy ball; sitting on a ball cushion allows your tailbone to be free.  When you use a ball cushion or ball, you develop active stomach and back muscles over time as a result of trying to maintain your balance
  • A good posture for resting is lying on your back on the floor, putting your feet up on the couch or bed, with a small pillow to support your back and/or head
  • If you have tailbone pain, this may be caused by your pelvic floor being too tight.  Favor positions that open your hips, push your legs downward away from your torso (sitting on the edge of the chair or on a ball) or crossing your feet under your chair; let your vaginal muscles relax as much as possible

3. Standing:

  • Bend your knees slightly
  • Distribute your weight evenly on both legs
  • Point your toes slightly outward
  • This posture may feel unnatural in the beginning, but if you look in the mirror, you’ll see that it looks quite normal.

Related Articles:

Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint dysfunction

SI Pain & Pregnancy – Tips

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy.

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