shin pain, shin splints

Shin Splints: Those Throbbing Legs

Shin Splints

What to do and How to prevent

Haven’t you ever experienced a strong pain and/or swelling in the legs after a strenuous activity using your lower limb (legs) like running or aerobics? It’s likely that you are experiencing what is known as shin splints. The area of the pain is at the shin. Tibia, popularly known as shin bone is the larger and stronger of the two bones in the leg below the knee, and it connects the knee with the ankle bones.

Running or repetitive weight bearing on the legs may lead to tension on the muscles around the shin bone. This causes swelling (inflammation) of the tissue around the bone, which causes pain.

Running on hard surfaces like concrete,  running on uneven ground, beginning an exercise program after a long , increasing exercise intensity or duration too soon , running in worn out or ill fitting shoes are common causes of shin splints.

What to do?

The treatment of shin splints begins with Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation (RICE). All of these should help to decrease the involved inflammation and pain.

Once the pain has subsided, exercise can be resumed, but it must be built up gradually to prevent a recurrence. If the pain resumes, it is best to stop the activity immediately.

How to Prevent Shin Splints?

Check the condition of your shoes. If they look worn out, or don't give you the support they once did, get a new pair.

 Strengthen calf muscles of your legs.

 Introduce any changes to your activity level gradually.

Mix high-impact exercises like running with low-impact exercises like swimming.

 Warm up before exercise and stretch after a strenuous activity. This will also help you feel less sore the next day.

 

 

 

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cryotherapy ice, heat therapy for pain relief

ICE or HEAT: Which Treatment to Choose

Ice Or Heat

Whats Your Choice Of Treatment?

Ever had any doubts regarding application of ice or heat in case of acute pain?

We hear this question very often as to howto choose ice vs heat as a choice of treatment. Well, remember ice is for fresh injuries & heat is for stiff, chronic aching muscles.

Acute injuries cause the soft tissues to inflame, turn red, hot & swollen. Icing is mostly a mild, drugless way of dulling the pain & inflammation. On the other hand, chronic pains usually involve a lot of tension in the muscles & soft tissues.Comfortable bearable heat will likely soothe these tensed muscles.

More importantly remember-WHAT ICE & HEAT ARE NOT FOR

Both ice & heat are pointless when not needed. Heat can make acute inflammation significantly worse & ice can aggravate symptoms of tightness & stiffness. In fact it can also make any pain worse when its unwanted.So, if you add heat to a fresh injury, watch out: its going to get worse. Instead apply ice & CHILL !

 

frozen shoulder treatment

Frozen Shoulder: Understanding and Care

About Frozen ShoulderFrozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition that leads to pain and stiffness of the shoulder. Signs and symptoms begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within one or two years. You will typically experience shoulder pain, followed by increasing stiffness. The stiffness may affect your ability to carry out everyday activities and, sometimes, you may not be able to move your shoulder at all.
1 Painful Stage
2 Frozen Stage
3 Thawing Stage

How does Frozen Shoulder progress?

Painful stage: During this stage, pain occurs with any movement of your shoulder, and your shoulder’s range of motion starts to become limited. This stage lasts for 3 to
9 months.
Frozen stage: Pain may begin to diminish during this stage. However, your shoulder becomes stiffer, and your range of motion decreases notably. This stages lasts from 4 to 12 months.
Thawing stage: During the thawing stage, the range of motion in your shoulder begins to improve with recovery. It may take anywhere from 12 to 42 months.

Frozen shoulder typically develops slowly, and in three stages. Each of these stages can last a number of months.

What are the Causes and Risk Factors?

Prolonged immobilization of the shoulder, such as after surgery (mastectomy) or an arm fracture. Usually affects woman above the age of 40 years. People who have certain medical problems appear to be predisposed to develop frozen shoulder.
Examples include:

  • Diabetes
  • Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)
  • Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism)
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Tuberculosis
  • Parkinson’s disease

TIPS to Ease Your Symptoms

1. Use a hot pack on your shoulder for 10 to 15 minutes several times each day. Place a thin towel between your skin and the hot pack to prevent a burn.
2. Move your arm often, every hour if possible.
3. Use medication as prescribed by your doctor.
4. Sleeping Comfortably : If you sleep on your back, place a pillow under your involved arm and allow your hand to rest on your stomach. If you sleep on your side, sleep on the uninvolved side hugging a pillow across your chest.
5. Sitting Positions : Sit with good posture. Avoid slumping and slouching. Try to keep your shoulders back and down away from your ears.

Why is Physiotherapy Required?  Self diagnose frozen shoulder

This condition though self limiting, leads to decreased movement at the shoulder joint. Even though pain may reduce to negligible
after a particular time, stiffness and range will continue to remain affected. If you’ve had an injury that makes it difficult to move your
shoulder, talk to your doctor about it.

TIPS to Ease Your Symptoms

1. Use a hot pack on your shoulder for 10 to 15 minutes several times each day. Place a thin towel between your skin and the hot pack to prevent a burn.
2. Move your arm often, every hour if possible.
3. Use medication as prescribed by your doctor.
4. Sleeping Comfortably : If you sleep on your back, place a pillow under your involved arm and allow your hand to rest on your stomach. If you sleep on your side, sleep on the uninvolved side hugging a pillow across your chest.
5. Sitting Positions : Sit with good posture. Avoid slumping and slouching. Try to keep your shoulders back and down away from your ears.
A visit to your physical therapist may be beneficial to help you regain normal functional use of your arm. Your Physiotherapist can help you manage the pain and provide you with strategies to help you start using your arm normally again.

Do’s

  • Continue to move your shoulder else it will progress to the next stage of stiffness.
  • Use hot pack before exercise for improving movement, relaxation and reduction in pain.
  • Continue to use the shoulder for more functional activities like combing hair, reaching out for over head objects etc.
  • Keep your diabetes under control.
  • Take your pain medications on time.

Don’ts

  • Avoid vigorous shoulder movements.
  • Avoid wearing an arm sling to promote arm movement even if it keeps your arm in a pain-free zone,

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy.

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