sacroiliac joint pain

SI Joint / Pelvic Pain – Do’s & Don’ts

Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Dysfunction can cause significant discomfort and pain in sitting and lying down. The Hip joint seems to have got locked and does not allow smooth transition from one position to another. Following are few techniques that can help significantly to ease such restricted movement and pain.

1. Rolling Over in Bed:

To roll over from your back to your side, bend one knee, placing your foot on the bed.  Push the heel down, slightly lifting your buttocks and turn towards the side on which the leg is still extended straight. The top arm helps the turning motion.

 

2. Sitting:tailor position

  1. When sitting (whether you are driving a car, riding a bicycle or sitting on a chair), press your chest upward and let your shoulder blades relax and drop.
  2. Sitting in a tailor’s position is good (crossed legged with your feet crossed underneath your legs) on the floor or on a very firm bed; use your hands to pull your knees gently back towards your hips and lift your chest, and keep your shoulders low.
  3. If you have been sitting in this position for a while, stretch forward as far as you can and touch the floor in front of you while keeping your spine straight.  At the same time, look up.  Practice this stretch as often as it feels necessary and good.

Static Sitting Positions:

  • Sit on a chair with your knees apart and slightly turned out
  • Sit in positions that relax your lower back while it remains supported, using a cushion or a rolled towel behind your back; sit upright when the back is not supported
  • You can also stretch your hips by sitting high enough so that your knees are lower than your hips or by crossing your feet under your chair.
  • Use a ball cushion while you are sitting, or sit on a therapy ball; sitting on a ball cushion allows your tailbone to be free.  When you use a ball cushion or ball, you develop active stomach and back muscles over time as a result of trying to maintain your balance
  • A good posture for resting is lying on your back on the floor, putting your feet up on the couch or bed, with a small pillow to support your back and/or head
  • If you have tailbone pain, this may be caused by your pelvic floor being too tight.  Favor positions that open your hips, push your legs downward away from your torso (sitting on the edge of the chair or on a ball) or crossing your feet under your chair; let your vaginal muscles relax as much as possible

3. Standing:

  • Bend your knees slightly
  • Distribute your weight evenly on both legs
  • Point your toes slightly outward
  • This posture may feel unnatural in the beginning, but if you look in the mirror, you’ll see that it looks quite normal.

Related Articles:

Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint dysfunction

SI Pain & Pregnancy – Tips

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sacroiliitis

Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint, or SI joint, is thought to cause low back and/or leg pain. The leg pain can be particularly difficult, and may feel similar to sciatica or pain caused by a lumbar disc herniation.

 Where is SI Joint and Why Does it Hurt?      Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

There are two Sacroiliac (SI) joints in your body, located on either side of the triangle-shaped bone at the bottom of the spine where it connects to your pelvis. The SI joints are a shock absorber for your spine and provide stability for your body as you run, walk, or jump. Interestingly enough, the SI joints usually don’t move more than 2 – 4 millimeters themselves. But each one contains many nerve endings that can cause significant pain if the joint is damaged or loses its ability to move properly. Everyday wear and tear, arthritis, or a single injury can damage these joints, changing their normal movement and creating chronic and sometimes debilitating SI joint pain that often, generally feels like low back pain.

Causes:

While it is not clear how the pain is caused, it is thought that an alteration in the normal joint motion may be the culprit that causes sacroiliac pain. This source of pain can be caused by either:

  • Too much movement (hypermobility or instability): The pain is typically felt in the lower back and/or hip and may radiate into groin area.
  • Too little movement (hypomobility or fixation): The pain is typically felt on one side of the low back or buttocks, and can radiate down the leg. The pain usually remains above the knee, but at times pain can extend to the ankle or foot.

Sacroiliitis (inflammation at SI Joint), Osteoarthritis, SI Joint Injury, Altered Walking Pattern, Infection, Prior Lumbar Fusion and Pregnancy are known to trigger SI Joint Dysfunction.

Symptoms of SI Joint Pain & Diagnosis

Some common symptoms for SI Joint Dysfunction are:

  • Low back pain: Usually a dull ache on one side of your lower back that may extend into the thigh.
  • Buttock Pain: Pain can range from an ache to a sharp stabbing pain that extends down one or both legs.
  • Low Back Pain While Climbing Stairs: Activities that require the pelvis to twist may produce SI joint pain.
  • Difficulty Sitting or Lying on One Side: Often experienced as an ache on one side that causes you to shift weight to one side to relieve the pain in the other.

It is important that a medical expert diagnose the cause of your lower back pain.  Though the symptoms may be similar, however the treatment will greatly depend upon the underlying cause.

Treatment for SI Joint Dysfunction:

Treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SI joint pain) are usually conservative (meaning non-surgical) and focus on trying to restore normal motion in the joint.

Typical treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction include:

  • RICE :  R.I.C.E. treatment that typically includes use of ice or cold packs, applied in 15 to 20 minute intervals as needed to reduce inflammation in the area, along with rest is recommended to ease symptoms. Depending on the duration of sharp, intense pain, ice can be continued anywhere between 2 days to 2 weeks. Once the inflammation is less, gradual return to normal activities may be advisable. Read more: RICE
    SI Joint belt
  • Medicines: Your doctor may prescribe pain medications as well as anti-inflammatory medications to reduce the swelling that is usually contributing to the pain.
  • Supports, braces and Belts: When the SI joint is “hypermobile” or too loose, an “orthotic” or SI brace about the size of a rather wide waist-belt can be wrapped around the waist and pulled snugly to stabilize the area. This can sometimes be very helpful at times when the joint is inflamed or painful. When it calms down, the support can be weaned away.
  • Physiotherapy and Exercise :

Controlled, gradual physical therapy is an evidence based technique found helpful to strengthen the muscles around the sacroiliac joint and appropriately increase range of motion. Supervised gentle exercise will help increase the flow of blood to the area, which in turn stimulates a healing response.

Contact a ReLivaTM Expert to get a customized SI joint pain treatment programs designed for your specific concerns. It may include stabilization training, stretching exercises and heat/ice therapy to compliment other treatment aspects prescribed by your doctor.

 

Coping with Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Adding exercise and physical therapy to your sacroiliac joint dysfunction treatment plan can significantly help you manage SI joint pain symptoms. There are numerous gentle exercises and stretches you can do to help decrease pain caused by SI joint dysfunction.

Contact a ReLiva Expert to design overall exercise plan for SI joint dysfunction, incorporating the 3 main types of exercise—aerobic, strengthening, and flexibility exercises—into your workout routine.

Related articles :

Do’s and Don’ts for SI Joint Pain / Pelvis Pain

SI Pain and Pregnancy

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pregnancy aches and pains

Pregnancy related Common Aches & Pains

Pregnancy causes many changes in the body – Physical, chemical as well as emotional. These changes are generally influenced by sudden and dramatic increase in hormone levels, especially Oestrogen, Progesterone and Relaxin.  Physical changes due to weight-gain can put a considerable strain on your musculo-skeletal system. The increase in weight along with the hormone named Relaxin, puts enormous stress on our joints, ligaments and other tissues of the body. In addition, repetitive daily activities and being in one position for too long can further aggravate pain.

If Relaxin is the reason our ligaments become laxed, then why does our body secrete it during pregnancy? Relaxin prepares the pelvic floor muscles and the pelvic ring for child birth. It allows the ligaments around the pelvis to relax. But along with pelvic ligaments, it also acts on the ligaments throughout the body, thus increasing general flexibility. Although increased in flexibility sounds promising, ligaments are responsible for stabilising our joints, therefore lax ligaments also mean relatively unstable joints.

Pregnancy and Pain

Common Aches & Pains related to Pregnancy   

A. SI Joint Pain

Sacroiliac Joint Pain occurs on one side of your low back where the dimples appear. This is where the sacrum and the ilium (bone of the pelvis) meet. Relaxin hormone weakens ligaments so the birth canal widens for delivery. Often, the ligaments become too loose and overstretched. This leads to an unstable pelvis which may feel “wobbly”. The tissues often become pinched in the joint which can create sharp or deep pain. The joint may throb for hours due to swollen, irritated tissues. Read more : SI Joint Pain in Pregnancy

B. Sciatica Pain

Sciatica is leg pain caused by pressure on the sciatic nerve from a tense buttock muscle. It often occurs in conjunction with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

C. Back pain

Back pain in pregnancy has many possible causes. It usually is caused by strain on the back muscles. In mid pregnancy, when uterus becomes heavier, it changes center of gravity. Most women begin to lean backward in the later months of pregnancy – making their back muscles work harder. Weakness of the abdominal muscles can also cause back pain. The abdominal muscles normally support the spine and play an important role in the health of the back. Relaxing over stretches these muscles and can also make one more prone to injury while exercising. Read more : Back Pain

Dealing with these Aches & Pains

Most of the common discomforts and aches & pains associated with pregnancy can be dealt easily by 3 simple non-medicinal ways:

You can join ReLivaTM FabMoms program and learn to deal with these aches & pains in an easy and fun way. Our Experts can design a customized one-on-one Antenatal Fitness plan for your requirement and supervise you on your way to be a FAB Mom or you may join a more fun setting for antenatal fitness in Group Therapy.

Related Articles:

SI Joint / Pelvic Pain – Do’s & Don’ts
Sacroiliitis, Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction
Benefits of exercise during Pregnancy
Posture in Pregnancy: Do’s & Don’ts
Happy & Fit Pregnancy ; Back to Shape afterwards
SI Pain & Pregnancy Tips
Infographic on Why Exercise while Pregnant

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy Policy.

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