office stretch for pain relief

5 minute Office Exercises: Back, Neck pain

Make time for Office stretches and improve your productivity.

Taking the time to stretch throughout the day anywhere – in office or at home, can have numerous health benefits. Stretching can improve flexibility and is an important activity to warm up or cool down after exercise. Stretching can also be a fun and healthy break from your computer screen during the work day. These stretches along with correct sitting posture at workplace, also helps you to keep all those pain in the back and neck away.

This Office Stretch Sheet provides you with 6 simple and effective stretches that you can complete whilst sitting at your work station. The newly developed Standing Stretch Sheet is perfect to do before a lunchtime walk, and for those who have standing roles.

Try The Banana,  The Emu,  Reach for the Sky, The Rock, The Twister and The Yes & No today.

We recommend you repeat each stretch twice, and hold each time for 20 seconds.

Print a copy and pin it up next to your workstation to remind you and your colleagues – Have you stretched today?

 

5minute ReLiva office stretching exercises while Sitting at your desk in office

 

Related Reading:

Ergonomics Programme for Corporate Employees

Working long on Computer : Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Ergonomics: Does it matter in your workplace

Neck Pain : Managing at Home

Physiotherapy, a sustainable solution for workplace Health & Wellness

 

Six Active Stretches

Stretching for sport and exercise improves flexibility, which increases the ability of a joint to move through its full range of motion; in other words, how far it can bend, twist and reach.

What happens when we stretch?

Regular stretching is thought to increase flexibility, both by making muscles more supple and by retraining the nervous system to tolerate stretching further. Flexibility from regular stretching gradually disappears once you stop stretching – typically after four weeks.

How to stretch properly?

To stretch properly and safely, slowly stretch the muscle just until you feel resistance. Resistance is the point at which you feel a slight pull. It should not be painful. Stop and hold each stretch for 10 to 20 seconds without bouncing up and down. During the stretch, breathe deeply and regularly. Don’t hold your breath. Make sure your muscles are warmed up before you stretch. The best time to stretch is after exercise, when your muscles are most supple. Learn to make the most of stretching by clicking here.

Active stretches you should be doing

Each of the exercises here is a dynamic stretch, which means it increases flexibility through movement, rather than by simply holding a position. “Active stretching decreases your risk of injury, relieves back pain, and boosts your athletic performance,” says Tanja Djelevic, who includes this series in her bendable body class at crunch fitness in West Hollywood. Try this routine before a race, after a workout, or at the end of the day—and experience the difference a little motion can make.

 

Pile stretch

1) Pile stretch   

What: Stretches inner and outer thighs, arms, shoulders, and back

How: Stand with feet wide, toes turned out, and raise arms overhead. Squat deep and lower the arms in front of you, elbows touching knees and palms facing forward. Pull right shoulder back as you raise right arm [shown], then twist in opposite direction, raising left arm. Rise up to starting position. Do 8 reps.

 

Low Lunge

2) Low lunge

What : Stretches intercostal muscles (between the ribs) and the thoracic cage aiding the lungs to take in more oxygen

How: Lunge forward with left leg until thigh is parallel to floor, and place hands on floor on either side of left foot. Raise left arm straight up toward ceiling as you rotate left shoulder back [shown]. Lower hand to starting position, and move into next stretch (active pigeon).

 

Active Pigeon

3) Active Pigeon

What : Stretches hip flexors, butt, and abs

How: Pull left knee in toward right hand, then lower left leg to floor so foot is below right hip. Lower hips as you push through hands, lifting head and chest [shown]. From this position, move into the next stretch (down-dog extension).

 

wrap around

4) Wrap around

What : Stretches neck and shoulders

How : Stand with feet hip-width apart and reach right arm behind your back, palm facing away from you. Clasp hands and pull left elbow back as you draw shoulder blades together. Hold as you circle head slowly [shown] to complete 1 rep. Do 8 reps.

 

take a bow

5) Take a bow

What : Stretches shoulders, legs, chest, and back

How : Stand with feet wide, left foot turned out, and rotate torso to the left. Clasp hands behind you with palms together and arms extended. Bend forward from hips until back is parallel to floor as you raise arms [shown]. Slowly rise up to starting position. Do 8 reps.

 

Standing side stretch

6) The standing side stretch

What: Stretches arms, torso

How: Stand with your feet together and your arms straight overhead. Clasp your hands together, with your fingers interlaced and pointer fingers extended. Inhale as you reach upward. Breathe out as you bend your upper body to the right. Take five slow breaths. Slowly return to the center. Repeat on the left side.

 

Related Reading

Stretching : How to make the most of it

The Activity Pyramid: Stay Active in a Fun way

Physically Fit : What does it mean?

No time for exercise? 10 tips to get moving

Healthy & Positive Habits to Protect you from Stress

walking for physical activity

Fitness Essentials : Walking

Walking is as simple as it gets for fitness. All you need is a good pair of shoes, comfortable clothing, and desire. Start walking towards a healthier you. Walking forms an essential part of our Activity Pyramid too.

Plan your routine. If you walk every morning, that’s perhaps the best! For it is during mornings when you beat all the traffic and catch the freshest air after the pollution has long settled down. Nature is just waking up with all its sound and visual beauty and most of us would love to witness it all during our walk.

Make it a habit! Usually it works best to have more-or-less the same time everyday for a walk. Form a routine – Morning or evening – whatever works for you (I know of some who have been walking even at 4 in the afternoon!) Afterall some exercise is better than none at all!

Build up your walk. Get Started. If you’re not active now, start walking three times a week at a stroll for 20 minutes.  Add five minutes to your walks next week (total walking time 20-25 minutes). Keep adding 5 minutes until you are walking as long as desired. Then start walking every day.

Distance or time? Some walkers focus on distance, others target time. Finally, it all boils down to speed. So use both distance and time as well as heart rate. Any reasonable health gadget or fit-bit will be able to track the heart rate while you walk. What should your heart rate be? “Most recommendations suggest starting out at 70% to 75% of your maximum heart rate,” Dr Neelam Patel, Sports Physiotherapist from ReLiva says. “But this may not be enough if you’re fit.”

How much is good ? Walking daily will help (a minimum of 5 days a week is a good goal). You should walk fast enough to maximize the benefits but a good thumb rule to judge it is that you should not be gasping for air.

If you are walking for weight loss you should walk a minimum of five days a week, 45 to 60 minutes at a brisk pace. ReLiva suggests “Talk test” to check your pace – You may consider the pace of walk to be good enough when you are walking fast, yet you can hold a conversation (atleast 4-5 word sentence) comfortably while walking.

As you start your walking routine, remember to:

  1. Get the right gear. Choose shoes with proper arch support, a firm heel and thick flexible soles to cushion your feet and absorb shock. If you walk outdoors very early in the morning when it is almost dark, wear white or bright colors or a windsheeter (during monsoons 7 winters) with reflective tape for visibility.
  2. Carry a reasonable size napkin or sweat cloth so you can wipe yourself dry and not get hassled with the sweat trickling on your face and neck.
  3. Drink up water before you begin. Proper hydration is very important as you are likely to loose important nutrients alongwith the sweat. If you are planning to walk for a long time, it may be nice idea to carry a small water bottle along.
  4. Choose your walking path If you’ll be walking outdoors, avoid paths with broken sidewalks, potholes, puddles, uneven pebbled roads or slippery tracks.
  5. Warm up. Walk slowly for five to 10 minutes to warm up your muscles and prepare your body for a brisker walk to exercise.
  6. Cool down. At the end of your walk, walk slowly for five to 10 minutes to help your muscles cool down and taper off the routine.
  7. Stretch. After you cool down, gently stretch your muscles. It may be a good idea to stretch before as well as after you walk.

There really are so many benefits for such a simple activity! Hope you are making the most of it!

Don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter and keep getting your monthly dose of Tips for an injury free fitness and pain free healthy life.

 

Related Reading:

Zumba: Tips to prevent injuries

The Activity Pyramid: Stay Active in a Fun way

7 Ways to keep your kids active : Physical Activity for Children

pregnancy exercises

Benefits of Exercise during Pregnancy

The benefits of Exercise during Pregnancy are immense. Antenatal fitness propagated by ReLiva Antenatal Experts emphasises on safe Exercises during Pregnancy owing to its several benefits. You need to be physically active during pregnancy. It has terrific benefits that are associated with a better pregnancy outcome and even shorter labors. It’s a win-win for baby and for mom.

Read on to learn more and see the infographic to get it one glance.

1. You are likely to gain less weight.

Research shows you might put on 3 kg less than pregnant women who don’t work out, while still staying within the healthy weight gain range.

2. Labor & Delivery may be easier.

Strong Abs & a fit cardiovascular system can give you more stamina for the pushing stage. One study found that prenatal water aerobics regulars were 58% less likely to request pain medication during labour than nonexercisers.

3. You lower your Gestational Diabetes risk by as much as 27 percent.

High blood sugar during pregnancy can put you at risk for developing type II diabetes in the decade after delivering & raises the odds of preterm delivery or having an overweight baby. Exercise may help prevent or delay your need for insulin or other medications.

4. You can avoid stress and anxiety.

Active moms-to-be report better moods than their sedentary peers, both immediately following a workout & in general throughout their pregnancies.

5. You avoid certain problems like backpain.

Exercise during second half of pregnancy seems to be especially helpful.

6. You are less likely to get constipated.

Pregnant women’s intestinal tracts often gets backed up due to high progesterone levels & a growing uterus, but exercise along with a high fiber diet keeps your digestive system humming.

7. You have more energy.

On days when lifting your remote control seems like a tall order, even a 10-minute walk can revive you. Pregnancy can sap your energy, but regular bouts of exercise will help you get through your daily tasks or cope with a demanding schedule: Exercise strengthens your cardiovascular system, so you don’t tire as easily. With muscles that are strong and toned, you need less effort to engage in any activity, whether that means grocery shopping or sitting through meetings at the office. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), you can safely take part in 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise every day, as long as you don’t have a medical condition or complication that your doctor or midwife has told you rules out exercise or limits your activity level.

8. You can enjoy the greatest flexibility of your life.

Relaxin, a pregnancy hormone that loosens your pelvic joints in preparation for delivery, also relaxes the rest of your joints. With careful stretches, like those done in prenatal workouts, you can capitalize on this window of opportunity.

9. You are more likely to avoid a forceps delivery, C-section or other intervention.

Regular exercisers are 75 percent less likely to need a forceps delivery, 55 percent less likely to have an episiotomy and up to four times less likely to have a caesarean section, research has found.

10. Get your body back faster after childbirth.

This alone is motivation enough for many women to embark on a pregnancy exercise regimen. When you’ve maintained your strength and muscle tone all through your pregnancy, your body will have an easier time bouncing back after you give birth. You’ll also gain less surplus weight if you exercise during your pregnancy.

11. You can Sleep better.

When you’re carrying an extra 15 pounds (or more!) in front of you, finding a comfortable sleeping position can be a real challenge. But exercise will help you work off any excess energy and tire you enough to lull you into a more restful sleep. (Get more tips for sleeping well during pregnancy.)

12. Lower blood pressure:

Blood pressure occasionally does go up during pregnancy, but too much and it can be a warning sign of preeclampsia. Staying active — in one study, simply walking regularly has been found to keep blood pressure from rising.

 

Pregnant women who have participated in FabMoms, a Prenatal Exercise Program have often reported happier moods and less pregnancy related aches & pains. To learn more about FabMoms, click here.

Related Articles:

Infographic on Why Exercise while Pregnant

Posture in Pregnancy: Do’s & Don’ts

Happy & Fit Pregnancy ; Back to Shape afterwards

FabMoms, Prenatal Exercise Program

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy.

stretching exercises

Stretching Exercises : How to Make the Most of it

Overview  I  Benefits  I  Types of stretches  I  Tips to stretch properly  I  Stretching FAQs

Stretching for sport and exercise improves flexibility, which increases the ability of a joint to move through its full range of motion; in other words, how far it can bend, twist and reach. This article attempts to guide how to stretch properly and get the most of it.

Stretching is a form of physical exercise in which a specific muscle or tendon (or muscle group) is deliberately flexed or stretched in order to improve the muscle’s felt elasticity and achieve comfortable muscle tone. The result is a feeling of increased muscle control, flexibility, and range of motion. Stretching is also used therapeutically to alleviate cramps.

Here are some of the main benefits of stretching. Hopefully these reasons will inspire you to make it part of your schedule!

For Your Body

  • Helps improve flexibility (increases your range of motion)
  • Assists in correct posture by lengthening tight muscles that pull areas of the body away from their intended position (because of so much time at our computers, many of us have tight chest muscles which pulls the shoulders and head forward, leaving us with a hunched shoulder look)
  • Increases blood and nutrient supply to muscles, thereby possibly reducing muscle soreness

For Your Mind

  • Even a short amount of time (10-15 minutes) of stretching can calm the mind, provide a mental break, and give your body a chance to recharge
  • Classes like yoga or pilates offer you a chance to spend an hour releasing tension physically and mentally

office stretch for pain relief

Different types of stretches

The benefits of stretching have been multi-fold that several styles of stretching have evolved over the years, each having their own set of advantages. Pick and choose the style that suits your routine.

  • Static stretch: This includes stretching a body part to the point of mild discomfort and holding that position to give a good stretch to the muscles of that area, typically for at least 30 seconds or longer.
  • PNF or Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation: This may be performed in various ways depending upon the practitioner. Howvere what remains common is to focus on contracting and relaxing the muscle while holding the stretch. This may not happen when you just begin to stretch but can be acquired with regular practise.
  • Dynamic stretch: This stretch has fast gained popularity with the uprise of Power yoga and dynamic yoga. While the basic movements for stretches remain the same as in static stretch, one needs to gently repeat movements, such as arm swings, where one gradually increases the range of motion of the movement, but always remains within the normal range of motion.
  • Ballistic or bouncing stretches: This too is a modification of static stretches. One gets into the basic stretch position and then performs a bouncing or jerky movement holding that position to increase range of motion.

How to stretch properly?

To stretch properly and safely, slowly stretch the muscle just until you feel resistance. Resistance is the point at which you feel a slight pull. It should not be painful. Stop and hold each stretch for 10 to 20 seconds without bouncing up and down.

During the stretch, breathe deeply and regularly. Don’t hold your breath. Make sure your muscles are warmed up before you stretch. The best time to stretch is after exercise, when your muscles are most supple. ReLiva suggests 6 active stretches that you must do.

To get the most out of the stretching you do, here are some suggestions:

1. Dont Skip the Pre-Workout Stretch

Your muscles should be warm before you begin your stretching. Do a warm-up before a workout that simulates the movements you’ll be doing in order to warm up and prepare your body. Stretch after the workout when your muscles are already warm.

2. Focus on the Muscles That Need the Most Help

Instead of trying to stretch your whole body after every time you exercise, focus on a key area of the body each time. Spend longer on each stretch and include more stretches for each area. If you are aware of muscles that are tight, then focus on those ones.

3. Include One Long-Duration Flexibility Session Each Week

Choose a flexibility class, such as yoga, pilates, or do your own flexibility work for 45-60 minutes at least once a week. If you’re having trouble sticking to it, follow these strategies and build it into your schedule/calendar

 

FAQs about Stretching 

Stretching, most often is a part of maintenance routine suggested to our patients once they recover and they are ready for discharge. That is when we hear a lot of questions about stretching from them. Our team attempts to answer the most frequently asked questions.

Q. What happens when we stretch?

Ans: Regular stretching is thought to increase flexibility, both by making muscles more supple and by retraining the nervous system to tolerate stretching further. Like it is for any type of exercises, flexibility attained from regular stretching will gradually disappear once you stop stretching – typically within 3-4 weeks.

 

Q. How much flexibility do I need?

Ans: It depends on your activity. The flexibility demands of a gymnast or a ballet dancer are clearly different to those of a runner. Someone who is just recovering from an incident of fracture or the treatment of which entails muscular restriction will have almost no flexibility in the affected limb and will have to work hard to regain flexibility to start using the limb properly.

On the other side, there is little to be gained for a jogger or runner from having the flexibility of a gymnast. Too much flexibility may reduce the muscle's natural spring, which may be detrimental for activities involving running, jumping and sudden changes in direction, such as running, football or football.

 

Q. Does stretching before exercise affect performance?

Ans: Stretching does increase your range of motion. A ballerina might require stretching before performance to do a full split during the show, even though she is weaker, her performance will be improved.

However, there is much debate on whether stretching makes your muscles weaker and slower (even though you might feel looser) before you engage in a full-fledged sport activity. The counter argument is that it is likely that duration of stretch used in the warm-up routines of most recreational exercisers may be cause negligible reductions in strength.

 

Q. Does stretching before exercising reduce the risk of injury?Ankle Sprain Causes & Recovery

Ans: It is widely believed that stretching does help before exercising. But there are mixed findings specifically if it works to reduce injury

While one set of studies concluded that stretching had little or no beneficial effect on reduction in injury risk; the most recent and largest of the three studies found "a hint" of an effect on reducing injuries like ligament tears, muscle tears, strains and sprains.

 

Q. How is stretching related to injuries - when do injuries occur?

Ans: It is important to understand that muscle injuries happen when the muscle is put under too much stress, typically when it is stretched under pressure – for instance, when lowering a heavy weight. (Picking and lowering an unusually heavy weight is the most common cause of back and muscle injuries)

The injury occurs not because the muscle isn't flexible enough, but because the muscle isn't producing enough force to support itself. A muscle might not produce enough force, either because it is not strong enough or it didn't contract at the right time for a particular movement ( which usually could be related to the right posture for doing that movement).

 

Q. Does stretching reduce soreness?

Ans: While you may find relief in dealing with soreness by stretching, there is no medical evidence that stretching does help to reduce or prevent a type of pain that can show up a day or two after exercising – also called delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).

 

Q. Should I stretch before exercising?

Ans: Your decision to stretch or not to stretch should be based on what you want to achieve. "If your objective is to increase your range of motion so that you can more easily do the splits, and this is more beneficial than the small loss in force, then you should stretch," says Dr Shreya.

 

Q. How should I warm up?

Ans: The purpose of warming up is to prepare mentally and physically for your chosen activity. A typical warm up will take at least 10 minutes and involve light aerobic movements and some dynamic stretching that mimics the movements of the activity you're about to perform.

Gradually increasing the range of motion of these movements during the warm up will prepare the body for more intense versions of those movements during the sport itself. This process will raise your heart rate and increase the blood flow to your muscles, thereby warming them up.

Warm muscles are less stiff and work more efficiently. Increased blood flow enables more oxygen to reach the muscles and produce energy. The warm up also activates the nerve signals to your muscles, which results in faster reaction times.

 

Q. Should I stretch after exercising?

Ans: There is some evidence that regular static stretching outside periods of exercise may increase power and speed, and reduce injury. The best time to stretch is when the muscles are warm and pliable. This could be during a yoga or pilates class, or just after exercising.

A post-exercise stretch will also slow down your breathing and heart rate, and bring the mind and body back to a resting state.

 

Now that you know all about stretching, we urge you to go on, try to build stretching into your daily routine and you are sure to see results. Stretching by itself may be a decent beginner's workout on the go as well as a good routine for warm up as well as cooling down for advanced workouts.

If you have trouble figuring out a good routine of stretches for yourself, do contact us on 9920991584 and we will connect you to one of our experts located near you!

Last Updated : June, 2018

 

Related Reading

Six Active Stretches

The Activity Pyramid: Stay Active in a Fun way

Physically Fit : What does it mean?

No time for exercise? 10 tips to get moving

Healthy & Positive Habits to Protect you from Stress

Benefits of Exercise during Pregnancy

office stretch for pain relief

Stretching : Make the most

Stretching is a form of physical exercise in which a specific muscle or tendon (or muscle group) is deliberately flexed or stretched in order to improve the muscle’s felt elasticity and achieve comfortable muscle tone. The result is a feeling of increased muscle control, flexibility, and range of motion. Stretching is also used therapeutically to alleviate cramps.

Here are some of the main benefits of stretching. Hopefully these reasons will inspire you to make it part of your schedule!

For Your Body      Stretching

  • Helps improve flexibility (increases your range of motion)
  • Assists in correct posture by lengthening tight muscles that pull areas of the body away from their intended position (because of so much time at our computers, many of us have tight chest muscles which pulls the shoulders and head forward, leaving us with a hunched shoulder look)
  • Increases blood and nutrient supply to muscles, thereby possibly reducing muscle soreness

neuro rehab

For Your Mind 

  • Even a short amount of time (10-15 minutes) of stretching can calm the mind, provide a mental break, and give your body a chance to recharge
  • Classes like yoga or pilates offer you a chance to spend an hour releasing tension physically and mentally

How to stretch properly?

To stretch properly and safely, slowly stretch the muscle just until you feel resistance. Resistance is the point at which you feel a slight pull. It should not be painful. Stop and hold each stretch for 10 to 20 seconds without bouncing up and down.

During the stretch, breathe deeply and regularly. Don’t hold your breath. Make sure your muscles are warmed up before you stretch. The best time to stretch is after exercise, when your muscles are most supple. We have a set of six active stretches that we suggest you should do everyday.

 

To get the most out of the stretching you do, here are some suggestions:

Don’t Skip the Pre-Workout Stretch

Your muscles should be warm before you begin your stretching. Do a warm-up before a workout that simulates the movements you’ll be doing in order to warm up and prepare your body. Stretch after the workout when your muscles are already warm.

Focus on the Muscles That Need the Most Help

Instead of trying to stretch your whole body after every time you exercise, focus on a key area of the body each time. Spend longer on each stretch and include more stretches for each area. If you are aware of muscles that are tight, then focus on those ones.

Include One Long-Duration Flexibility Session Each Week

Choose a flexibility class, such as yoga, pilates, or do your own flexibility work for 45-60 minutes at least once a week. If you’re having trouble sticking to it, follow these strategies and build it into your schedule/calendar.

 

Related Reading:

Six active Stretches

This article is purely for general information. Please contact your healthcare expert for specialised medical care. Please go through our Disclaimer and Privacy policy.

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